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Color Spectrometer Review: Asensetek Lighting Passport

Color spectrometers are a valuable tool to confirm the quality of the lights you use on your video and film sets. In this continuation of our Color Spectrometer series, we review the Asensetek Lighting Passport spectrometers, looking at its functionality, features, and how well it takes various measurements of light.

Understanding Color Spectrometers

Color spectrometers are important for testing the color quality of lights used in your video and film projects. Many common color indices — such as CRI and TLCI — only tell a small fraction of a very large picture. Without fully looking at the color quality of your lights you may find out in post that you used a low quality light for your scenes, which ended up destroying the color in your image.

This article discusses how to use the average color spectrometer, what color characteristics to look out for, how to understand all the data and graphs, and how to take the spectrometer to the next level such as comparing light from a fixture before and after adding gels like CTO, minus green, and others.

In future articles we will look at specific spectrometers — such as Sekonic C700, UPRTek CV600, Asensetek Lighting Passport Essence Pro, and Asensetek Lighting Passport Standard Pro — along with their specific features and some of their limitations.

How To Use A Light Meter: Overview

Last week I covered how a light meter is still necessary in our digital age. This week it’s time to learn how to use the light meter. In this video I cover the incident meter and the spot meter, and when to use them. Then it’s demonstration time, using the meter in different ways to properly expose a scene. Finally, I give you some tips and tricks on how to quickly determine the lighting ratios and range of your scene, along with a few more.

Red Epic Dragon vs. Red Epic MX, Part 01: Dynamic Range & Latitude [VIDEO]

How To Create A Sekonic DTS Profile For Your Light Meter [VIDEO]

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